ABOUT ME

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Welcome! I'm a doctoral student in the Philosophy Department at Georgetown University. My philosophical interests are broad, but my work in metaethics and in ethics of tech and AI is unified by a concern with the relation between sociality and normativity.

Philosophy is currently in the midst of a social turn. Our community is pouring new energy into fields like social epistemology and social ontology, and across the discipline we have turned our focus toward political and ethical issues involving social roles, social positions, and social justice. For all its momentum and appeal, however, this social turn has yet to make a measurable impact in the subdiscipline of metaethics. Few metaethicists contend with social themes in their work, and those who do so offer significantly attenuated social accounts. In my dissertation, I argue that the inadequacies of these social accounts come with broader theoretical costs to bear. I then build conceptual additions and alternatives to these accounts and show how they can help to avoid the theoretical costs.

 

As a Fritz Family Fellow, I'm researching the ethics of social media research. My work includes interdisciplinary relationships with members of the Computer Science Department, including joint research and co-authored papers. My current project argues that the literature in social media research ethics is ineffectual in driving ethical consensus because philosophers are looking for quick adaptations of ethical concepts like “privacy” from one field to another rather than backing up and re-framing the ethical issues around the converging social contexts of social media and social science research.

Outside of philosophy, I enjoy learning new perspectives and new vocabularies. I am an avid hiker and an amateur botanist. I spent six summers in my 20s teaching natural history at Nature Camp in Virginia, and I thru-hiked the Appalachian Trail in 2012. I consider myself to be a secular Buddhist, and I think a lot in my spare time about what mindful resistance to oppression could look like.